Archive for category: Problem Solved

Cache-busting HTML Pages


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17 Feb
February 17, 2014

I ran into a scenario twice this week where I pushed updates to a site and it was important that the changes were reflected immediately. Most of the time it isn’t a big deal if a change takes an hour or so before someone sees them without a forced refresh (Shift + Refresh). Indeed, according to the Apache Caching Guide, “The default expiry period for cached entities is one hour.” This time, I was making a change, and then sending out an email to all our subscribers linking directly to the change. I only got the go-ahead to push the change live about 5 minutes before the email was supposed to be sent. On a final test of the email blast, I noticed the link went to the old version; the changes weren’t being shown until after I refreshed a few times. Read more →

Easy Python SOAP with SUDS, with a few Date/Time gotchas.


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27 Sep
September 27, 2012

suds duckIn the world of web services, SOAP is a bit like the quip about the old Holy Roman Empire. It’s neither Simple nor an Object nor a Protocol (talk amongst yourselves). Actually though, the main thing is that it’s not all that simple. It’s just a teensy bit verbose and over-engineered for most uses. So in order to consume a partner’s SOAP web service with a minimum of overhead and teeth-gnashing, we use a very lightweight SOAP client called “suds”. In addition to its too-precious name, the other benefit of suds is that it is simple. To connect to a web service, you just do the following:

from suds.client import Client
url = 'http://localhost:3000/webservices/WebServiceTestThing?wsdl'
client = Client(url)

And you have a connection to the web service. It’s just that easy™. Read more →

A broadcast storm


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26 Sep
September 26, 2012

A broadcast storm occurs when a network system becomes overloaded by continuous multicast or broadcast traffic. This happens when different nodes start sending and broadcasting data over a network link, and the other network devices respond by rebroadcasting the data back to that same network link.  Eventually, this overload will cause the entire network to melt down and lead to the failure of network communication. It is a system admin’s worst nightmare (especially if it is a Monday morning!) and promises a very interesting day to say the least!

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Another Python 2 Unicode Mystery Solved


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08 Jun
June 8, 2012

The challenges of Unicode with Python 2.x are decried throughout the internet. This little devil had me scratching my head for quite some time. The test script is simple enough:

#!/usr/bin/python
desc = u"The Quick Brown Fox Jumped over the lazy Dog\u2019s Back!"
print desc

One can easily see that a Unicode string is being created with a special character the \u2019 which is a right apostrophe. Python handles this just fine when run from the command line.
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